Liturgy Corner

Carmel Parish Bulletin articles from the Liturgy Committee


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We Listen

Actions of the Assembly

Actions of the Assembly

Carmel Bulletin, 17 November 2013

We believe that God speaks to us, his people, particularly in the Liturgy of the Word at Mass.  The scriptures provide a rich treasury of God’s continuing dialogue with us.  Not only did God speak to those people, at the time that the original texts were spoken or written, but God speaks to us still now.  The messages that the scriptures contain still bear meaning and relevance for us today.

Dialogue requires not just speaking, but listening as well.  We are called to listen during the celebration of the Eucharist, particularly when God speaks to us in the proclamation of the scriptures.

There is a difference between hearing and listening.  We may hear someone speaking to us, but are we attentive to what is being said?  Dictionary definitions of listen often refer to paying attention, to making some kind of effort when hearing something.  True listening is an active rather than passive activity.

St Benedict

St Benedict

 

Coat of Arms of Blessed John Henry Newman, with motto, "heart speaks to heart"

Coat of Arms of Blessed John Henry Newman, with motto, “heart speaks to heart”

St Benedict encouraged people to “listen and attend with the ear of your heart”.  This is a wonderful explanation of how we are called to listen in liturgical celebrations.  It reminds us that the word of God doesn’t exist simply to teach us, but to transform us.  Listening draws us into a deeper relationship with God, as reflected in Blessed John Henry (Cardinal) Newman’s motto, “Heart speaks to heart”.

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We Speak

Carmel Bulletin, 3 November 2013

Actions of the Assembly

Actions of the Assembly

The prayers that we pray during Mass give voice to our needs and concerns, our joys and sorrows, our praise and thanksgiving, our faith and belief.  Our words serve part of a dialogue, both between those of us gathered and participating in the celebration, and between us and God who dwells among us and listens to our needs.  We speak to petition, to praise, to affirm the prayers and actions of the whole assembly.

Our common prayers serve as a sign of our tradition.  Our prayers draw upon texts from, and make reference to, sacred Scripture.  Many of them have their origins in prayers first composed centuries earlier.  Through our prayer, we join with the generations of people who go before us, in heaven and on earth, who are marked with the sign of faith.

Our common prayers also serve as a sign of our unity as the people of God.  We speak with one voice, united not just with each other gathered together in this church, but in every church building throughout the Church.

The Mass: Sacrifice and Praise